SAN ZEFERINO

About

Completed 1914 as SAN ZEFERINO for Eagle Oil. 18-9-1915 torpedoed and sunk. Raised and repaired in 1916. 1937 sold to Anglo-Saxon as depot ship at Gibraltar. 1946 renamed KATELYSIA. 2-2-1951 arrived Blyth for scrap.

Also known as
Katelysia
IMO number
1136653
Call sign
GQXN
Construction number
831
Tonnage
6.430 ton
Beam
16m
Length overall
126m
Year of construction
1914
Year of renaming/broken up
1951
Service for Shell
1914 to 1951
Cargo
Class
Flag state
Home port
Manager
Shipyard
Status
Photo(s)

Comments

Anecdotes

Date Visitor Anecdote
04/25/2014 - 16:39 Charles T. Patrick

My Grandfather Arthur George Patrick was Electrical 5th Engineer on San Zeferino but was killed when it was Torpedoed on 26-09-1917. I am trying to find where he was buried as his body was recovered to Birkenhead after ship was raised

03/06/2013 - 23:39 Richard Smith

My grandfather was Chief Officer on San Zeferino and I have a letter he wrote to his wife on 21.10.1920 when the ship was about 100 miles from Tampico, Mexico en route from Avonmouth. I dread to think what it must have been like to sail in such awful weather but these are his words. "We had 4 days exceptionally bad weather from the Saturday after we left Port until the next Wednesday. We hove to for about 26 hours then turned round and ran before the wind and sea for another 30 hours losing a lot of time but that could not be avoided. Although light ship we had an awful lot of damage about the decks fore and aft, had the hospital entirely gutted and everything in it too, including the passengers gear as it was filled up with water. Had an awful lot of trouble during the bad weather with the Telemotor steering gear endangering the ship and all hands on several occasions. Had to steer aft each time it went wrong and I had to take watch 4 hours on and 4 hours off with the officers for 3 days. Eventually I had the steering gear overhauled and found the trouble and put it right after a lot of hard work by the engineers and everything has been in our favour since, each day making up for lost time. I really don't think we could have had it much worse . Several ships had worse damage and 2 SOS calls in the vicinity, so considering everything we did very well. The passengers all thought that their end had come on several occasions. They are all OK now and a very nice crowd they are. Had an enjoyable passage since the bad weather."
My Grandfathers name was Mr G P Clark and I think the Captain was Mr Bate.